Teacher's Guide to a Successful Classroom
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Co-Teaching - Team Teaching - Inclusion - Helping Teacher

Co-Teaching, Team Teaching, Inclusion, Helping Teacher.... are all words we are hearing more frequently and tends to be an uncomfortable topic for many educators...... "You mean someone else is coming into my classroom to teach with me?" "She's going to be a spy." "I don't need anyone else in here disturbing my students and interrupting my lesson.".... I've been both a classroom teacher and an inclusion teacher so I understand the feeling on both sides. The key to this type of arrangement being successful is training. As an inclusion teacher many years ago when no one really knew what inclusion was, I felt useless. I wanted my own classroom and the teachers felt I was a wasted paycheck because "they didn't need me in there." Now that I have had training on what inclusion is I feel more comfortable with the program and training teachers on how to implement it. The important thing to remember is that the model you use depends on the lesson you want to teach. You do not have to select only one model and use it all of the time.

6 Models of Inclusion: 
One Teach One Observe
Station Teaching
One Teach One Assist
Alternative Teaching
Team Teaching
Parallel Teaching 


One Teach One Observe
One teach one observe is pretty much like it sounds. One teacher teaches and one observes. The main reason to use this is to observe on task/off task behaviors. The two teachers must be very comfortable with one another and acknowledge that this is never a "spy on you" setting.  

Ideas on when to use:
collect on task off task behavior for individual student or class
Collect data on levels of questioning
Collect data on % of questions for boys vs. girls

Station Teaching
During station teaching the class is divided into three groups. One for each teacher and one independent. Each station works on a different but related skill. The timeframe for the lesson is divided into three segments and students rotate through the stations. Ex. One station works on vocabulary, one reads the story, and one does an independent reading activity. Students spend 20 minutes in each station during the 60 minute reading lesson.

One Teach One Assist
This is the method used most often but should be used the least. With this model one teacher teaches and one moves around the room assisting anyone needing help or re-direction. The problem with this model is that one teacher may get tagged by the students as the helper. This also causes teachers to become uncomfortable with one another as one teaching feels like she's doing all of the work while the other gets off easy. The teacher observing also feels bad as she could begin to feel like a "helper" instead of a certified teacher.

Alternate Teaching
With alternate teaching the class is split into two groups and each group is being taught a different lesson. Example: Ms. Martin's is teaching her group an enrichment activity on adding alliteration to their creative writing project while Mr. Saxon is teaching his group about correct punctuation. These groups do not switch.

Ideas for using Alternate Teaching
RTI groups
Enrichment group
Working on skill deficits

Team Teaching
During team teaching both teachers work together teaching the lesson. With team teaching you get the combined knowledge of both teachers. A great outcome for team teaching is one teacher can teach the students a given strategy for a lesson then the other teacher can jump in and demonstrate a different strategy. The students can then choose which one they want to use. This shows children that we don't all have to do things the exact same way.

Parallel Teaching
During parallel teaching the class is split into two groups and both teachers are teaching the same skill. The great thing about parallel teaching is that it reduces the teacher pupil ratio allowing more opportunities for students to ask questions.




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